Archive for the ‘Editorials’ Category

Anthrax, from left: Charlie Benante, Frank Bello, Scott Ian, Joey Belladonna, Jon Donais

By Greg Maki
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On the business side, it might be harder for a band to exist now than it ever has been. But in the world of hard rock and metal, that hasn’t stopped countless acts from releasing album after album of quality material. Anyone who says there’s no good music today hasn’t looked past the FM dial. The previous year was one of the strongest in recent memory, highlighted by a number of veteran acts releasing albums that stand up to the best of their impressive back catalogues and newer bands still carving out names for themselves. Here are my favorites of 2016. (more…)

Metallica even released an album in 2016!

So the ball may have dropped long ago on 2016, which many deemed a dreadful year for entertainment due to many high-profile celebrity deaths. While our genre has lost some legends in recent years, hard rock and metal continue to thrive. I see bands rising and carrying the torch. We have the “world’s loudest month” in the U.S. for rock festivals. Metal is the most streamed genre on Spotify. Newer bands of all types of rock and metal subgenres continue to open eyes and ears not just here, but as always, worldwide. As usual, my list came down to the albums that not only initially knocked me on my ass, but also had me coming back time and time again. It mostly comprises reliable favorites, but there are a couple new surprise entries, as well.

First, we’ll start with a few honorable mentions: (more…)

While it’s impossible to listen to every release in a given year, the albums below provided my personal soundtrack for 2015. And with the exception of a couple bands, all the others in my top 10 are new to my year-end best-of lists. This, to me, proves heavy metal is alive and well. View the list inside. (more…)

Ghost

Ghost

By Greg Maki

Another year has come and gone, and in my opinion, 2015 was one of the strongest in recent memory in terms of quality hard rock and metal releases. My top 10 list includes bands on the rise, veteran acts reinventing themselves and a farewell to one of the most iconic figures in rock ‘n’ roll. I don’t expect everyone to agree with my picks, but you don’t have to. It’s my list, not yours. (more…)

Scott Weiland (1967-2015)

Scott Weiland (1967-2015)

Like everyone else in the music world, Live Metal is deeply saddened by the passing of Scott Weiland. The former Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver frontman was found dead on his bus last night, Dec. 3, while on tour with his latest band, dubbed Scott Weiland and the Wildabouts, in Boomington, Minnesota. (more…)

This entry is part 11 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Danzig songs
(FROM LEFT) CHUCK BISCUITS, GLENN DANZIG, EERIE VON AND JOHN CHRIST MEMBERS OF DANZIG.

(FROM LEFT) CHUCK BISCUITS, GLENN DANZIG, EERIE VON AND JOHN CHRIST

With legendary frontman Glenn Danzig set to release his Skeletons covers album (read review), it’s time to take a look back at the early Danzig recordings, featuring the now-classic original lineup of Danzig (vocals), John Christ (guitars), Eerie Von (bass) and Chuck Biscuits (drums). This lineup was active from 1987 to 1994 and released the most iconic and revered albums among fans with Danzig (1988), Danzig II: Lucifuge (1990), Danzig III: How the Gods Kill (1992) and Danzig 4 (1994). Not to discredit Danzig’s later recordings, but much like the songs on Skeletons were a huge part of Glenn Danzig’s youth, songs from these albums were of mine, and they helped to shape me into the metalhead I am today. Here are my top 10 Danzig songs.

View the list here.

This entry is part 1 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Danzig songs

Here are my Top 10 Danzig songs of the now-classic original lineup of Danzig (vocals), John Christ (guitars), Eerie Von (bass) and Chuck Biscuits (drums). This lineup was active years 1987-1994 and released the most iconic and revered albums among fans with Danzig (1988), Danzig II: Lucifuge (1990), Danzig III: How the Gods Kill (1992) and Danzig 4(1994).

Danzig2na1. “Her Black Wings”
(Danzig II: Lucifuge, 1990)

For myself, “Her Black Wings” is the signature Danzig track. It encompasses all the evil and occult nature of this band, along with being a perfectly executed song. The music video is also iconic. Lyrically, Glenn seems to be enchanted by a Demoness of which he’ll be taken to Hell, under “her black wings.”

Honorable mentions that could have very easily cracked the Top 10: “Twist of Cain” (Danzig) “Snakes of Christ” (Danzig II: Lucifuge), “Sistinas” (Danzig III: How the Gods Kill), “Bringer of Death” (Danzig 4)

This entry is part 2 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Danzig songs

Here are my Top 10 Danzig songs of the now-classic original lineup of Danzig (vocals), John Christ (guitars), Eerie Von (bass) and Chuck Biscuits (drums). This lineup was active years 1987-1994 and released the most iconic and revered albums among fans with Danzig (1988), Danzig II: Lucifuge (1990), Danzig III: How the Gods Kill (1992) and Danzig 4 (1994).

Danzig2na2. “Killer Wolf”
(Danzig II: Lucifuge, 1990)

This song didn’t start out as one my favorite Danzig tracks, but the bluesy and equally creepy “Killer Wolf” grew on me and has stood the test of time. Danzig had said that “Killer Wolf” is his version of an old blues song about a guy who wolfs around the door of every girl in town.” I remember this video originally airing on MTV’s Headbanger’s Ball nearly as much as “Mother.” On a side note, Danzig sure did make a lot of music videos back in the day, didn’t he?

This entry is part 3 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Danzig songs

Here are my Top 10 Danzig songs of the now-classic original lineup of Danzig (vocals), John Christ (guitars), Eerie Von (bass) and Chuck Biscuits (drums). This lineup was active years 1987-1994 and released the most iconic and revered albums among fans with Danzig (1988), Danzig II: Lucifuge (1990), Danzig III: How the Gods Kill (1992) and Danzig 4 (1994).

Danzig_cover3. “Mother”
(Danzig, 1988)

Most casual fans would probably have guessed “Mother” as the No. 1 Danzig song in this list. Well, I’m no casual fan. Don’t get me wrong, the song is fantastic and is still the band’s most well known song, but there’s a couple a like even more. This was, however, the first song I ever heard from Danzig on MTV’s Headbanger’s Ball way back in 1988. My initial feelings were mixed, as it was like nothing I had ever heard. I was even more shocked when the song became a smash in 1993 when a live version appeared on Thrall/Demonsweatlive and another music video was made.

 

This entry is part 4 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Danzig songs

Here are my Top 10 Danzig songs of the now-classic original lineup of Danzig (vocals), John Christ (guitars), Eerie Von (bass) and Chuck Biscuits (drums). This lineup was active years 1987-1994 and released the most iconic and revered albums among fans with Danzig (1988), Danzig II: Lucifuge (1990), Danzig III: How the Gods Kill (1992) and Danzig 4 (1994).

Danzig_III_How_the_Gods_Kill4. “How the Gods Kill”
(Danzig III: How the Gods Kill, 1992)

As I previously stated, How the Gods Kill is Danzig’s most complete album. Slotting in a track no. 4 and clocking in a nearly six minutes long, the title track is one of Danzig’s most epic recording achievements. From Glenn’s lyrics and slow, quiet parts, to the uproar of another classic riff from John Christ, it’s easy to get lost in this song. “Would you let it go?”

This entry is part 5 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Danzig songs

Here are my Top 10 Danzig songs of the now-classic original lineup of Danzig (vocals), John Christ (guitars), Eerie Von (bass) and Chuck Biscuits (drums). This lineup was active years 1987-1994 and released the most iconic and revered albums among fans with Danzig (1988), Danzig II: Lucifuge (1990), Danzig III: How the Gods Kill (1992) and Danzig 4 (1994).

Danzig2na5. “Devil’s Plaything”
(Danzig II: Lucifuge, 1990)

Danzig’s debut album had already perked my interested in the band, but it wasn’t until Danzig II: Lucifuge that I was a true Danzig fan, and later a “fiend.” From Danzig’s channeling of Jim Morrison to the bluesy metal riffs, Lucifuge has a unique and nostalgic sound from start to finish. “Devil’s Plaything” is one of the only Danzig songs I can see the ladies getting into. I know it’s weird for me to say this, but it’s a song tailored made for strip clubs and it’s sexy in it’s own way.

This entry is part 6 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Danzig songs

Here are my Top 10 Danzig songs of the now-classic original lineup of Danzig (vocals), John Christ (guitars), Eerie Von (bass) and Chuck Biscuits (drums). This lineup was active years 1987-1994 and released the most iconic and revered albums among fans with Danzig (1988), Danzig II: Lucifuge (1990), Danzig III: How the Gods Kill (1992) and Danzig 4 (1994).

Danzig_III_How_the_Gods_Kill6. “Dirty Black Summer”
(Danzig III: How the Gods Kill, 1992)

Released in July 1992 and featuring album art by H. R. Giger, Danzig III: How the Gods Kill is arguably the most complete sounding Danzig recording from start to finish. It’s heavier than the first two Danzig albums, while also possessing an atmosphere of gloom and doom. I was 14 years old at the time of its release and the song “Dirty Black Summer” was my soundtrack for the summer. Hunkered down in my bedroom, I spent many of nights listening to Danzig III. The summertime thunderstorm intro is instantly recognizable.