Posts Tagged ‘Peter Steele’

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A Tribute to Peter Steele of Type O Negative

April 14th is an important day in the history of heavy metal. Five years ago, (April 14, 2010) we lost the great multi-talented and imposing frontman of Type O Negative, Peter Steele, ending an era and one of the greatest gothic metal bands we’ll likely ever hear. For bands that focused on death, romance, the occult and a sick, sarcastic humor, Type O Negative became synonymous—there really was “none more negative.” We never had the chance to interview Peter or even cover Type O Negative with Live Metal, as we were only a few years in when he untimely passed away in his sleep due to heart failure. For myself, losing Steele and this amazing band that was an enormous part of my adolescence is something that still makes me sad to this day—it’s on the same level as losing former Pantera guitarist Dimebag Darrell (no disrespect to Dimebag, obviously). But as the years pass by and I grow older, Type O Negative’s music is becoming something more and more of the past. So on this anniversary of the death of the great Peter Steele, let’s keep the music alive by checking out a few features we’ve done on the band below: (more…)

Type O Negative: Kenny Hickey, Johnny Kelly, Peter Steele, Josh Silver

Type O Negative: Kenny Hickey, Johnny Kelly, Peter Steele, Josh Silver

Interview: Johnny Kelly (Danzig, A Pale Horse Named Death, ex-Type O Negative) Part 1: Kill Devil Hill and bands

For gothic metal that focused on death, romance, the occult and a sick, sarcastic humor, Type O Negative became synonymous—there really was “none more negative.” The name says it all. The Brooklyn band—vocalist/bassist Peter Steele, vocalist/guitarist Kenny Hickey, keyboardist Josh Silver and drummer Johnny Kelly—became known as the “drab four,” releasing the smash hit—and Roadrunner Records’ first-ever platinum-selling album—Bloody Kisses in 1993 and the now-classic October Rust in 1996. The band remained active over the next decade, releasing World Coming Down (1999), Life is Killing Me (2003) and Dead Again (2007), becoming one of the most recognized metal bands during its run, providing the Halloween soundtrack for a lifetime.

The band came to a sudden and sad end on April 14, 2010, when Peter Steele died, reportedly from heart failure. Fans like me were devastated. Type O Negative’s music was something we grew up with, and I guess we figured that entity would always be there for us. Well, you know what—it will. That’s the thing about music—it never dies. If kept alive, it can take on a new life of its own and live forever. 

While we interviewed Kill Devil Hill’s new drummer Johnny Kelly about his joining the band, it was inevitable that the conversation would turn to Type O Negative for the band’s former drummer, and that it did. I couldn’t help but act like a gushing fanboy talking to Johnny, remembering the time that was Type O Negative and all that came with it. And Johnny was more than happy to talk about it. Like all of us, he misses it and Peter deeply.

In part two of our interview with Kelly, he tells us how he remembers Type O Negative’s fallen vocalist, the high point of the band’s career and how he plans to incorporate elements of Type O into his reactivated band with Hickey, Seventh Void. (more…)


There’s been a lot of news out of the Kill Devil Hill camp recently (the band featuring former Pantera bassist Rex Brown). The band is about to embark on a U.S. tour with hard rockers, Kyng and recently confirmed slots at Rock On The Range and Rocklahoma. And in March 2014, the band welcomed the addition of Type O Negative, Danzig, and A Pale Horse Named Death drummer Johnny Kelly into the fold. We recently spoke at length with Johnny about joining Kill Devil Hill and replacing the legendary Vinnie Appice. (more…)

This entry is part 9 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Least Worst Type O Negative Songs

inmemoriamPSIn my lifetime, I’ve heard hundreds of bands that have come and gone, but rarely have I missed a band’s music as much as I miss Type O Negative’s. With the sudden loss of iconic, multitalented frontman Peter Steele, the band was laid to rest permanently in April 2010. But every year during the Halloween season, I not only listen to Type O, but I find it necessary to visit the grave of an old friend. So there’s no better playlist for this time of year than one from the band that believed “every day was Halloween.”

2. “Christian Woman” (from Bloody Kisses, 1993)
The first single, “Christian Woman,” was a three-part epic (cut and censored for video and radio play) centered on a haunting melody, an ultra-heavy, rhythmic guitar riff and Steele’s passionate vocals. The subject matter seemed innocent on the outside but was actually quite obscene. When studying the lyrics, the song seems to be about a young Christian woman that becomes lustful toward Jesus Christ and God, and maybe even masturbates while fantasizing about God.

This entry is part 8 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Least Worst Type O Negative Songs

inmemoriamPSIn my lifetime, I’ve heard hundreds of bands that have come and gone, but rarely have I missed a band’s music as much as I miss Type O Negative’s. With the sudden loss of iconic, multitalented frontman Peter Steele, the band was laid to rest permanently in April 2010. But every year during the Halloween season, I not only listen to Type O, but I find it necessary to visit the grave of an old friend. So there’s no better playlist for this time of year than one from the band that believed “every day was Halloween.”

3. “Summer Breeze” (from Bloody Kisses, 1993)
The Seals and Crofts classic transformed into a menacing cover.

This entry is part 7 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Least Worst Type O Negative Songs

inmemoriamPSIn my lifetime, I’ve heard hundreds of bands that have come and gone, but rarely have I missed a band’s music as much as I miss Type O Negative’s. With the sudden loss of iconic, multitalented frontman Peter Steele, the band was laid to rest permanently in April 2010. But every year during the Halloween season, I not only listen to Type O, but I find it necessary to visit the grave of an old friend. So there’s no better playlist for this time of year than one from the band that believed “every day was Halloween.”

4. “Wolf Moon (Including Zoanthropic Paranoia)” (from October Rust, 1996)
A fan favorite. The band already had a vampire song, so this was quite logical.

This entry is part 6 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Least Worst Type O Negative Songs

inmemoriamPSIn my lifetime, I’ve heard hundreds of bands that have come and gone, but rarely have I missed a band’s music as much as I miss Type O Negative’s. With the sudden loss of iconic, multitalented frontman Peter Steele, the band was laid to rest permanently in April 2010. But every year during the Halloween season, I not only listen to Type O, but I find it necessary to visit the grave of an old friend. So there’s no better playlist for this time of year than one from the band that believed “every day was Halloween.”

5. “My Girlfriend’s Girlfriend” (from October Rust, 1996)
Classic tongue-in-cheek humor, which played a huge part in the band. This may have been the catchiest song post-Bloody Kisses. And you know what? I never realized an official video existed for it until now. Check it out.

This entry is part 5 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Least Worst Type O Negative Songs

inmemoriamPSIn my lifetime, I’ve heard hundreds of bands that have come and gone, but rarely have I missed a band’s music as much as I miss Type O Negative’s. With the sudden loss of iconic, multitalented frontman Peter Steele, the band was laid to rest permanently in April 2010. But every year during the Halloween season, I not only listen to Type O, but I find it necessary to visit the grave of an old friend. So there’s no better playlist for this time of year than one from the band that believed “every day was Halloween.”

6. “Too Late: Frozen” (from Bloody Kisses, 1993)
For a while, this served as the band’s opening song live, sending the moshers into an immediate frenzy.

This entry is part 4 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Least Worst Type O Negative Songs

inmemoriamPSIn my lifetime, I’ve heard hundreds of bands that have come and gone, but rarely have I missed a band’s music as much as I miss Type O Negative’s. With the sudden loss of iconic, multitalented frontman Peter Steele, the band was laid to rest permanently in April 2010. But every year during the Halloween season, I not only listen to Type O, but I find it necessary to visit the grave of an old friend. So there’s no better playlist for this time of year than one from the band that believed “every day was Halloween.”

 “Love You To Death” (from October Rust, 1996)
Arguably the biggest hit single/video or “least worst” song from October Rust.

This entry is part 3 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Least Worst Type O Negative Songs

inmemoriamPSIn my lifetime, I’ve heard hundreds of bands that have come and gone, but rarely have I missed a band’s music as much as I miss Type O Negative’s. With the sudden loss of iconic, multitalented frontman Peter Steele, the band was laid to rest permanently in April 2010. But every year during the Halloween season, I not only listen to Type O, but I find it necessary to visit the grave of an old friend. So there’s no better playlist for this time of year than one from the band that believed “every day was Halloween.”

8. “Halloween in Heaven” (from Dead Again, 2007)
One of the newest entries on this list, the song was destined to be a surefire fan favorite, but never reached this height during Steele’s life.

This entry is part 1 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Least Worst Type O Negative Songs

inmemoriamPSIn my lifetime, I’ve heard hundreds of bands that have come and gone, but rarely have I missed a band’s music as much as I miss Type O Negative’s. With the sudden loss of iconic, multitalented frontman Peter Steele, the band was laid to rest permanently in April 2010. But every year during the Halloween season, I not only listen to Type O, but I find it necessary to visit the grave of an old friend. So there’s no better playlist for this time of year than one from the band that believed “every day was Halloween.”

10. “All Hallows Eve” (from World Coming Down, 1999)
There’s really not a better starting point for this playlist, right?

This entry is part 11 of 11 in the series The Top 10 Least Worst Type O Negative Songs

inmemoriamPS

In my lifetime, I’ve heard hundreds of bands that have come and gone, but rarely have I missed a band’s music as much as I miss Type O Negative’s. With the sudden loss of iconic, multitalented frontman Peter Steele, the band was laid to rest permanently in April 2010. But every year during the Halloween season, I not only listen to Type O, but I find it necessary to visit the grave of an old friend. So there’s no better playlist for this time of year than one from the band that believed “every day was Halloween.”

View The Top 10 Least Worst Type O Negative Songs here.